British Museum responds to accusation about displaying potentially looted artefacts from the Amphipolis tomb

Last month news emerged about British soldiers potentially having looted the Amphipolis tomb while stationed in the area during the First World War. Several of these items were believed to have been illegally removed by Dr Eric Gardner, at the time a medical officer posted in the area, and donated to the British Museum.

The British Museum has composed a letter in response to the accusations of displaying looted artefacts from the Amphipolis tomb. In the letter they draw attention to the fact that the items currently on display in the museum have been dated to the 6th century BC and therefore predate the creation of the Amphipolis tomb by 2 centuries. They have also stated that the items were exported from Greece with the permission of the Greek government. There has been no comment from the Greek government itself on this matter.

Click on the images below to read the letter in its entirety.

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Source: Zougla.gr

Related articles: British soldiers may have looted the Amphipolis tomb during WWI

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on “British Museum responds to accusation about displaying potentially looted artefacts from the Amphipolis tomb
2 Comments on “British Museum responds to accusation about displaying potentially looted artefacts from the Amphipolis tomb
  1. Pingback: Anfipoli: la testa della sfinge riunita al corpo | ClassiCult

  2. What strikes me at the British Museum’s statement is of course the term ‘donated’. How can one donate something that doesn’t belong to them? So, imagine that you are away on holidays and your house gets flooded so you kindly ask your neighbours, who hold a spare key to your property, to allow access to emergency services to sort out the flooding. While they are there helping the emergency services, your neighbour finds a golden bracelet which they decide to ‘donate’ to the charity of their choice. How does this sound to you? Well…that’s exactly the case with the artefacts displayed in the British Museum (and to extend this claim with the Parthenon marbles as well). In case of Amphipolis, the Greeks asked British troops to help out with the Bulgarian conflict and while the British soldiers were in Greece, they found and ‘donated’ these artefacts to the British Museum (who gladly of course accepted them without, probably asking any questions!). All this looks like history repeated and I pretty sure the line of defence is that they were taken so they can be protected! The fact is that if something doesn’t belong to you, then you cannot take it or donate it, or buy it for the matter.

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